Happy Tails: Cosette

Sweet Cosette the tabby spent her kitten and adolescent years on the Toronto streets. It’s thought that she was born in a barn and adjusted to outdoor life as a feral cat. When she was found by ACR in 2012, we noticed that she had already been ear tipped. This is commonly used for marking stray cats that have been spayed or neutered.

Cosette had some health issues, but nothing life-threatening. Veteran foster mom Lynn gladly took her in and was excited to get Cosette adapted to indoor life before finding her a forever home. “I think she was my fourth foster kitty, “ says Lynn fondly. “I loved them all. I had made a promise to myself to continue with fostering as it was fun to have a different cat and find them forever homes.”

Happy Tails - Cosette

Cosette adjusted to indoor life right away. Always purring happily, she was nothing but content with her new foster home. “She was so easygoing [while I fostered her]—she was always a total love bug,” Lynn says. Having fostered numerous cats before, Lynn was a pro when it came to meeting potential adopters. She loved talking about cats with them, enthusing over how each has their own personality and traits that make them unique. After two years of fostering Cosette, she realized that she’d become extremely attached. “Over time, when someone inquired about her, I would get upset at the thought of her going elsewhere,” she remembers.

In 2014 Lynn officially adopted nine-year-old Cosette, turning what was supposed to be a temporary friendship into a new forever family. “I guess I was done playing the kitty field,” she laughs.

Cosette is a wonderful example of how a stray cat can be socialized and adopted into a domestic environment. Cats that have a tipped ear have already experienced human interaction, and are sometimes less apprehensive than if they have not been trapped, spayed/neutered, and returned. Some cats have a relaxed personality no matter their living conditions, and take to socialization very naturally. Cosette was at ease with people and adapted well to her life inside. It’s a wonderful thing when it happens, but good foster parents know when to tell the difference between happy and distressed cats. Some cats may seem to enjoy interacting with humans but become stressed and uncomfortable when attempts are made to socialize them.

Happy Tails - Cosette

If you happen to stumble upon an affectionate feral cat, it’s important to do what you can for it—but know when it is set in its ways. Remember not to force a cat to live a certain way of life. Some felines are simply happier living in colonies. Cosette continues to be proof that some cats do well in a new home, and it’s something positive for every volunteer/trapper/adopter to remember.

— Leah Morrison

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